Overall cancer death rates continue to decline for U.S. men, women and children, according to the latest Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, released today. Overall cancer death rates fell an average 1.5% per year between 2001 and 2017, declining in every racial and ethnic group between 2013 and 2017. Over those four years, death rates declined for 11 of the most common cancers for men and 14 of the most common cancers for women, and an average 1.4% per year for children and 1% per year for adolescents and young adults. Between 2012 and 2016, overall cancer incidence (rates of new cancers) leveled off among men, and increased slightly for women and an average 0.9% per year for adolescents and young adults. According to a companion report, the nation met Healthy People 2020 targets for reducing cancer death rates, although not in all sociodemographic groups. 

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