Near universal health care coverage could be achieved without a complete overhaul of the health system, according to a report released today by the Urban Institute and the Commonwealth Fund. The report analyzes eight health care reforms and their potential effects on insurance coverage, national health care costs, and spending by federal and state governments, consumers and employers. The plans fall along a continuum — from improvements to the Affordable Care Act to a single-payer reform similar to Medicare for All proposals. One of the plans modeled in the report — which, among other actions, would enable workers to opt for subsidized non-group coverage instead of their employer’s insurance plan, improve the ACA’s subsidies to help people afford coverage and cover people in states that have not expanded Medicaid — would achieve near universal coverage of all Americans and improved affordability.

Related News Articles

Headline
The Campaign for Sustainable Rx Pricing, for which AHA is a founding member, today launched a petition and digital ad urging drug companies to suspend their “…
Headline
An estimated 9.5% of U.S. residents, or 30.7 million people, lacked health insurance when surveyed in the first six months of 2019, according to preliminary…
Perspective
On Tuesday, the Census Bureau reported that “a third of Americans now show signs of clinical anxiety or depression” due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s also…
Headline
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services yesterday released a fact sheet for state and local governments seeking Medicare, Medicaid or Children’s…
Headline
An annual report into death by several factors tied to mental health and wellbeing — otherwise referred to as “deaths of despair” — topped 150,000 in 2018. The…
Headline
State Medicaid programs are reporting an uptick in enrollment compared with their fiscal year 2020 projections, due in part to the COVID-19 pandemic. The…